THE COLOR OF LAW

Ricahard Rothstein & Ta-Nehisi Coates

In this rigorous examination of U.S. housing policy, Rothstein exposes a century of unconstitutional federal, state, and local laws designed to segregate American cities. 


He combines legal research with heartbreaking human stories to demonstrate the history and impact of this government push for segregation, including its influence on tragedies like those in Ferguson and Baltimore. 


The Color of Law is the first book to debunk the myth that racial segregation after Jim Crow arose from private prejudice, and it provides an entirely new perspective on our segregated neighborhoods—and new strategies to address the injustices that divide them.   


Rothstein is in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coates. Coates is a national correspondent for The Atlantic, a MacArthur ‘genius’ grant winner, and the author of The Beautiful Struggle and Between the World and Me, which won the National Book Award for nonfiction in 2015.  Founded by Carla Cohen and Barbara Meade in 1984, Politics and Prose Bookstore is Washington, D.C.'s premier independent bookstore and cultural hub, a gathering place for people interested in reading and discussing books. 


Politics and Prose offers superior service, unusual book choices, and a haven for book lovers in the store and online. Visit them on the web at http://www.politics-prose.com/ 


THE COLOR OF LAW

the new jim crow

Jennifer Michelle Alexander - 2013

Michelle Alexander, highly acclaimed civil rights lawyer, advocate, Associate Professor of Law at Ohio State University, and author of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, delivers the 30th Annual George E. Kent Lecture, in honor of the late George E. Kent, who was one of the earliest tenured African American professors at the University of Chicago.  The Annual George E. Kent Lecture is organized and sponsored by the Organization of Black Students, the Black Student Law Association, and the Students for a Free Society. 


Michelle Alexander, author "The New Jim Crow" - 2013 George E. Kent Lecture