HUMAN RACE: BEING BI-RACIAL

Asian and white couples are the most common form of ntermarriage today.


Race isn't real. There is no scientific proof it exists, and yet the concept shapes how we see the world, how we are perceived by others and how we see ourselves. 


History shows us that four-letter word is often all that stands between freedom and captivity, prosperity and poverty, even life and death. And when it comes to personal identity, society's interpretation of this concept doesn't really allow for people who may be a combination of two or more ethnicities.  


Feeling different or excluded is a shared experience among many children of two or more ethnicities. That is largely due to society's lack of understanding around the issue. The census has only recently allowed this population to self-identify as black and white, Hispanic and black, white and Asian. Not too long ago those individuals would fall into one catchall category: other.   


A majority of mixed-ethnicity individuals (55%) say they've been the butt of racial jokes and slurs, and about one in four say they feel frustrated when people make assumptions about their identity, according to a survey from the pew research center. The survey showed that about one in five individuals (21%) say they feel pressure from family, friends or society to identify with one ethnic group. Additionally, experiences and attitudes are vastly different based on the cultures at play.   


Asian and white couples are the most common form of ntermarriage today. Many are seen as white and identify as white. When multi-ethnic individuals seek acceptance among minority communities, they often encounter the open wounds of systemic racism and the privileging of lighter skin and the glorification of Eurocentric beauty standards.  


The Southern Poverty Law Center reports a dramatic uptick in hate crimes between the election on November 8 and November 14. Over 400 incidents targeted minorities around the country. A racist flyer was passed around the Southern Methodist University campus warning white women against entering relationships with black men. 


An "alt-right" logo in the bottom right corner leads many to believe the flyer is associated with the fringe white nationalist group the alt-right. President Donald Trump's chief political strategist Steve Bannon is the former head of Breitbart News, an outlet Bannon proudly told reporters is "the platform for the alt-right."  


Backlash from white supremacist groups comes as America's demographics are changing. Since 1980 the rate of intermarriage has almost quadrupled. 


In 2013, 2.1 percent of Americans self-identified as two or more races. And that number climbs to around 7 percent when parents' and grandparents' ethnicities are factored in. As we look towards a nation filled with mosaic members of the human race, maybe we as a society should rethink how we approach identity. 


SIMONE BOYCE 


IS RACE REAL?

INTERRACIAL FAMILY MANAGES RACE RELATIONS

How Does This Interracial Family Deal with Racism?

Raising two boys in the south, this multi-racial, cross-cultural, and multi-lingual blended-family works hard and plays hard. Chris and Donella's older son Dylan—who they co-parent with Chris’ ex-wife— is a straight A student who loves soccer and cheering for Real Madrid. Their younger son, Miles, attends a Mandarin Chinese immersion school where he loves to play violin and compete on the swim team. Whether English, French (Chris’ native-tongue), or (a remedial version of...) Mandarin, their home is always filled with music and love. 


BLENDED BI-RACIAL FAMILY

WHAT DARK-SKINNED PEOPLE WILL NEVER TELL YOU

Colorism, Beauty and Whatever!


In the Urban Dictionary, the word colorism is defined as a discrimination that only happens in black communities. It is when dark-skinned people, usually women, are seen as unattractive and light skin black people are seen as attractive. However, colorism is not only happening in the black community. Colorism is a discrimination against individuals with dark skin tone, and it occurs in lots of ethnic groups. 


 

Latinos, Asians and Blacks have for so long been told that if we do not have European features, then we are considered unattractive, ugly, dirty (just to name a few). At a young age, I began to realize my skin was not the definition of beautiful. You see, I never felt ugly, but eventually, I started to hate my skin color. I know some people will say," You're so silly, I wish I was dark. You have such beautiful skin," but the thing is, your words mean nothing when people's action are always saying that dark skin is appalling. At a young age, kids are told to date light skinned people and to not date anyone who's darker than them. Instead of having a conversation about loving your skin, we are told the opposite.

Colorism exists. I promise, I am not making it up. Whether it is Korean, Indian or in Latin American novels and soap operas, the main characters are light skinned. 


The novelas I grew up watching featured light skin Latinos as attractive, intelligent and successful, while the dark skin actors played indigenous roles, poor people or the bad guys. 


This form of hierarchy is not only going on in Latin America, but in other places, as well. For instance, in Bollywood movies, the Indian actors cast in the movies have an olive skin tone, but we do not really see darker people in those movies, as if darker people do not exist.


Colorism is not only about having lighter skinned people portrayed in TV. Colorism is a big issue that we need to dismantle. That's why "melanin is beautiful" has been a statement I have seen on social media. To say melanin is beautiful is saying that dark skin tones matter, are beautiful and need to be recognized. 


That is not saying that if one has light skin they are ugly. No, not at all. You see, everyone has been told that light skin or anything close to white is the norm. We have grown up thinking that way, and if anything was not close to white, we thought of it as ugly. 


Society has made different ethnic groups hate each other because of our skin color, and that needs to stop. We need to embrace dark skin tones just the way we embrace light skin tones. 


WHAT DARK-SKINNED PEOPLE WILL NEVER TELL YOU

WHITENESS

The Meaning of a Racial, Social and Legal Construct

In the wake of Donald Trump’s election and bestselling books like  "Hillbilly Elegy" and "White Trash," there is a growing realization that  whiteness is as much a social racial and political identity as being  African, Latin, Asian or Native American. 


In partnership with the Jimmy  Carter Presidential Library and Museum, JWJI is pleased to host a panel  on the evolution of whiteness in American society. Our esteemed panel  brings their interdisciplinary perspective to the panel to explain why  race—including whiteness—still matters in America. (November 16, 2017)  


PANELISTS:


Richard Delgado, John J. Sparkman Chair of Law, The University of  Alabama School of Law, author of Critical Race Theory.


David Ikard, Professor of Africana Studies, Vanderbilt University,  author of Blinded by the Whites: Why Race Still Matters in the 21st  Century.


Nancy Isenberg, T. Harry Williams Professor of History, Louisiana State  University, author of White Trash. 


Jane Junn, Professor of Political Science, University of Southern  California, author of The Politics of Belonging: Race, Immigration, and  Public Politics.

 

David Roediger, Foundation Professor of American Studies and History,  University of Kansas, author of The Wages of Whiteness.


The James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference  supports research, teaching, and public dialogue that examine race and  intersecting dimensions of human difference including but not limited to  class, gender, religion, and sexuality.


WHITENESS

TRICIA ROSE, ph.d

HOW STRUCTURAL RACISM WORKS

 

Tricia Rose

Born and  raised in Harlem and the Bronx in New York City, Tricia Rose graduated  from Yale University where she received a BA in Sociology and then  received her Ph.D. from Brown University in American Studies. She has  taught at NYU, and UC Santa Cruz and is currently Chancellor’s Professor  of Africana Studies and the Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at Brown University. Rose also serves as  Associate Dean of the Faculty for Special Initiatives. 


In addition to  her duties at Brown, Professor Rose sits on the Boards of the Nathan Cummings Foundation, Color of Change and Black Girls Rock, Inc.

 
Rose is an internationally respected scholar of post civil rights  era black U.S. culture, popular music, social issues, gender and  sexuality. She has been awarded for her teaching and has received  several scholarly fellowships including ones from the Ford Foundation,  the Rockefeller Foundation, and the American Association of University  Women.  


HOW STRUCTURAL RACISM WORKS


STRUCTURAL RACISM LECTURE SERIES - DECEMBER 2015

JOANNE JONES-RIZZI

Connecting Muesums to Race, Identity & Ethnicity

Joanne Jones-Rizzi joins the senior leadership team as Vice President  of STEM Equity and Education; however, her career at the Science Museum  is long and accomplished. In her new role, she will lead the Science  Museum’s education initiatives, ensuring that they achieve maximum  impact and are equitably accessible for all audiences.


Jones-Rizzi  has a decades-long career working on systemic, ecological change within  museums, specializing in expanding meaningful access through  exhibitions relevant to audiences who do not yet think of museums as  their cultural institutions. In her previous role as Director of  Community Engagement at the Science Museum of Minnesota, she led a group  that is committed to being intentional about defining community and  creating approaches that advocate equitable access, reciprocity,  meaningful participation, and cultural relevance to a broad range of  communities. 


Before coming to the Science Museum of Minnesota,  Jones-Rizzi was an exhibit developer and cultural program director at  the Boston Children’s Museum, where she led an initiative that addressed  the institution-wide politics of inclusiveness, ranging the full  spectrum from community partners to the museum’s board of trustees. She  is the co-author of Opening the Museum, a book that reflected  on this process. She has also written numerous articles exploring ideas  related to identity, race, and community.


Jones-Rizzi is the co-creator and concept developer of several award-winning exhibitions, including The Kid’s Bridge (Boston Children’s Museum, 1990), The Kid’s Bridge (Smithsonian Institution, 1992), Boston Black: A City Connects (Boston Children’s Museum, 2004), and RACE: Are We So Different? (Science  Museum of Minnesota, 2007 with a national tour through 2015). 

She is  the recipient of several awards for her anti-racism work, including a  Facing Race Ambassador Award from the Saint Paul Foundation in 2016. She  advises museums nationally and internationally on culture, identity,  anti-racism, exhibition development, and community engagement.


Joanne Jones-Rizzi honored with AAM 2018 individual award for  DEAI


Museums, White Privilege, and 

Diversity: A Systemic Perspective

RACIAL PROFILING IN THE U.S.

WHAT KEEPS TRIGGERING ANTI-BLACK HARRASSMENT?

Professor and author Michael Eric Dyson discusses the incident in which Yale University police officers were called to investigate a napping black graduate student and other similar incidents in America. 


Michael Dyson is a highly acclaimed sociologist, author, and black historian. He discusses the "micro-aggressions" against Black people nationwide. 


Brianna Keilar, CNN Interviews Michael Dyson about these issues facing Black and Brown people. 


YALE UNIVERSITY UNDER SCRUNITY - CNN BROADCAST

SYSTEMIC RACISM: NOT A NEW ISSUE IN AUSTRALIA

AUSTRALIA'S YOUNG ADULTS ARE OUT OF CONTROL

Racism is more entrenched and systemic than most of us realise. Using a range of practical case studies, Jonathan shows how Australia's white supremacist history continues to influence present-day political, legal and cultural institutions. 


Mainstream conversations about racism too often focus on overt bigotry, rather than covert structural oppression. The deeper issues are ignored and deprioritised. But pretending that race is irrelevant in the twenty-first century won't make racism go away.  


Jonathan is a writer, musician and community organiser with a strong interest in democratic reform and non-hierarchical political structures. Much of his writing focuses on xenophobia, systemic racism and the normalisation of whiteness. Jonathan is a former Queensland poetry slam state champion, and was runner-up in the Australian poetry slam grand finale. He has performed poetry at the Sydney and Brisbane Writers Festivals and as far afield as London and Berlin. 


Jonathan has lived and worked in remote Aboriginal communities in north-east Arnhem Land as both a cross-cultural mediation facilitator and a community development worker. His views on racism have also been heavily shaped by his personal experiences as the son of a Tamil migrant. In his spare time, 


Jonathan organises underground community gig nights in houses and backyards around South Brisbane.  


SYSTEMIC RACISM: AUSTRALIA'S GREAT WHITE SILENCE

CNN'S BLACK IN AMERICA

Soledad OBrien's Talk at Google

The Global Diversity & Inclusion team and the Black Googlers Network  hosted an exclusive pre-screening and panel of CNN's Black in America  4. 


What follows is the panel discussion.  Panel Introduction by Michele Thornton - Sr. Director of Multi-Cultural Sales, CNN  Panel discussion with: - Navarrow Wright, CTO, Interactive One (moderator) - Soledad O'Brien, Anchor, CNN - Angela Benton, Founder, NewMe Accelerator & BlackWeb 2.0 - Chris Genteel, Diversity Business Development Manager, Google 


CNN'S BLACK IN AMERICA - TALKS AT GOOGLE. Moderator: Soledad O'Brien

THE SECRET TO CHANGING THE WORLD

CULTURAL INDIFFERENCES ON RACE

Lee Mun Wah is an internationally renowned Chinese American documentary filmmaker, author, poet, Asian folk teller, educator, community therapist and master diversity trainer. 


He is the Founder and Executive Director of StirFry Seminars & Consulting, a diversity training company that provides educational tools and workshops on cross-cultural communication and awareness, mindful facilitation, and conflict mediation techniques. His most famous film about racism, The Color of Fear, won the Gold Medal for Best Social Studies Documentary and in 1995, Oprah Winfrey did a one-hour special on the film and Lee Mun Wah's life.


 In 2013, he will be releasing his latest film, If These Halls Could Talk, which focuses on college students speaking their truth about racism and other diversity issues in higher education and beyond. 


Lee Mun Wah talks about the power of cultural perspective and the need to reach beyond the superficial in making cross-cultural connections. 


THE SECRET TO CHANGING THE WORLD


RACISM RE:WIRED

ALLI MCKEE TURNS RACISM UPSIDE DOWN

After watching the news about police brutality and racial tensions in Baltimore and elsewhere, graduate student McKee found herself wondering how our universal “fear of otherness” impacted her own perspective. In her talk on rewiring racism, she makes some eye opening discoveries of her own that have changed her life.  Alli McKee is passionate about people. 


An entrepreneur and a student at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, she is committed to developing leaders and empowering young entrepreneurs. Before Stanford, 


Alli worked at Bain & Company before teaching entrepreneurial leadership and creative arts to students from 44 different countries at African Leadership Academy. Her professional and personal experiences in South Africa rekindled her interest in race issues, which she focused on as an American studies major at the University of Virginia. When she came home to another racial crisis in the United States, she wanted to do something about it – start talking. 


REWIRING RACISM

How to Talk to a White Supremacist

Changing Perspectives with "truthful" conversations

Simon Tam and his all Asian band, entered a maximum security prison, filled with white supremacists, to play a concert, expecting the worst to happen. In this surprising and heartfelt talk, 


Simon shares his story of what happens when you take a moment to really have a conversation with another person.   Simon Tam is an award-winning musician, best-selling author, entrepreneur, and social justice activist.  Simon is best known as the founder and bassist of The Slants, the world’s first and only all-


Asian American dance rock band. His approach to activism through the arts has been highlighted in thousands of media features across 82 countries, including: BBC World News, NPR, TIME Magazine, TED talks, NBC, and the New York Times.  Since 2000, he has been a performer, presenter, and keynote at events and organizations such as TEDx, SXSW, Comic-Con, The Department of Defense, Stanford University, Rotary International, and over 1,200 others across North America, Europe, and Asia. 


How to Talk to a White Supremacist

RACISM, XENOPHOBIA AND THE ECONOMY

Economic Condition on Xenophobia and Race

Racism and xenophobia are facts of past and present society. But sometimes, it can be difficult to discuss them in grounded ways. In this talk, economist Naci Mocan helps us do that by taking us back through history, and he explains how economic conditions can have an effect on feelings of racism and xenophobia - and what we can do about it.  


Dr. Naci Mocan's research demonstrates that every decision, including whether or not to commit crime, how many cigarettes to smoke, how much effort to spend on the job, can be tied to economics. An LSU Professor, Dr. Mocan and has often focused his attention on the behavior of individuals. His passion for illuminating the economic determinants of everyday decisions leads him toward research on subjects like the economics of crime, corruption and vengeance.

 

Dr. Mocan’s research pushes boundaries of research and examines the inner workings of our world through the lens of an economist. 


His work has gained him international attention, with coverage in various media outlets across the globe. He earned his Ph.D. in economics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His recent work has focused on the interplay between economic behavior and culture. 


How Economic Conditions Affect Racism and Xenophobia


WHAT DOES RACE HAVE TO DO WITH EPIDEMIOLOGY?

RACE/ETHNICITY HEALTH DISPARITIES

Dr. Karen Tabb Dina is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She conducts research in the area of race/ethnicity and health disparities. One topic of keen interest in her program of research is the health and well-being of multiracial or mixed race adults in the U.S.  

Join social epidemiologist, Dr. Karen Tabb Dina, who explains her work on learning the health patterns of mixed race Americans and why it is important to critically examine race/ancestry in health research.  TEDX UIUC


Mixed Race America and the Future of Health

AMERICAN MULTI-RACIAL DIVERSITY IN 2050

THE TALKOS' PERSPECTIVE - THE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC'S ISSUE ON THE CHANGING FACES IN AMERICA BY 2050.


If you’ve ever thought about how humankind will change in the future, then you’ll love watching our video about how humans will look by 2050 and beyond. The National Geographic’s 125th-anniversary issue looked at the “changing face of America” and explained why, in a few decades time, the population would be multiracial. 


WHAT WILL PEOPLE LOOK LIKE IN 2050?

ETHNICALLY AMBIGIOUS

START YOUR CONVERSATION BY GETTING TO KNOW WHO I AM, FIRST!

Liz Hobson


Liz's TEDxLehighRiver Talk is based on one of the unique perspectives of many multiethnic people, and how that perspective is critical to help all of us learn how to engage and connect with each other across stereotypical race “color lines”.


She offers strategies for overcoming sub-conscious racism.  Elizabeth Dobson is a multiracial woman and the youngest of three children adopted into her all white family. She grew up in rural Pennsylvania where she thrived socially and academically despite being one of few minorities in her hometown. Liz recently created a blog to educate and empower a growing demographic of interracial and adoptive families.  


She understands they have important and unique challenges and perspectives within their families and communities.  



How To Fix Our Sub-Conscious Racism: A Mixed-Race Perspective

AFFINITY BIAS - are we all guilty?

INCLUSION, EXCLUSION, ILLUSION & COLLUSION

Hele Turnbull, CEO of Human Facets.


Helen has a 25+ year successful track record in the field of Global Inclusion. 

She is an internationally recognized Thought Leader on Unconscious Bias, global inclusion and diversity.  As creator of "Cognizant" -- Unconscious Bias assessment tool and the "ISM Profile" for measuring Inclusion Skills gaps, her work has contributed to clients winning the Catalyst Award for Gender improvements.  


Helen is passionate about Inclusion work and relaxes by watching and playing golf. 


Inclusion, Exclusion, Illusion and Collusion : Helen Turnbull at 

TEDX DELRAY BEACH 




ARTICLES, REPORTS & PUBLICATIONS

Teaching about religious extremism can be challenging, but not teaching about it may sow seeds of intolerance. This toolkit for "Extreme Prejudice" is an activity that teaches students about religious diversity and that extremists—in any religion—represent a small minority of people.
Resource: Teaching Tolerance, A project of the Southern Poverty Law Center  ©1991-2018


 

WHAT IS THE TRUTH ABOUT AMERICAN MUSLIMS (pdf)

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CASEY BUDD ON BEING MIXED ( BI-RACIAL)